American Journal of Internal Medicine

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Analysing Health Professionals' Adherence to National Guidelines and Comparing Diabetes Care in Specialized Care Centres and Hospitals

Received: 9 February 2024    Accepted: 1 March 2024    Published: 13 March 2024
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Abstract

The socioeconomic impact of diabetes treatment includes significant costs for diagnosis, treatments, hospitalizations, and associated social challenges. According to the International diabetic federation (IDF) guidelines, effective management entails a holistic strategy including nutritious diet, avoiding carbonated beverages, quitting smoking, and routine exercising. Targeted weight loss is critical, comprising antidiabetic medications, a specific food plan, and lifestyle changes to attain a 7-8% glycated hemoglobin level. Proper medicine and footwear use reduces ulcer risks and further complications. The IDF emphasizes detailed treatment plans and sequential screenings. Diabetes management is obligatory, focusing glycaemic control, lifestyle changes, and risk assessment. A study examines treatment programs, medical behaviour, and factors impacting diabetic care reception. This study examined diabetes mellitus treatment in medical facilities by conducting health information reviews in outpatient clinics with a sample size of 400 records. Java applets detected problems, indicating 95% confidence in therapy. Cross-sectional studies in Peshawar hospitals included 250 patients, whereas specialized diabetic treatment centers evaluated 150 patients. Documented care differed; public hospitals had lower foot inspection rates (16.4%) than specialized care (14%). Statistical analysis, such as the Chung test and binary logistic regression, was used to assess variable relationships. Smoking was common (86%), and 59.8% relied on oral anti-diabetic medications. Less than 30% follow up examinations were recorded in public hospitals which showed discrepancies in documentation. Diabetes management can be improved, particularly through better screening procedures. Discrepancies between provided and documented care underscore the need for higher documentation standards. Private clinics demonstrated comparatively better care, possibly influenced by consultation fees, facility availability, and a comfortable environment—attributes lacking in public hospitals in Pakistan.

DOI 10.11648/j.ajim.20241201.11
Published in American Journal of Internal Medicine (Volume 12, Issue 1, February 2024)
Page(s) 1-10
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Diabetes Mellites Type 2, Guidelines, Management, Primary Care Hospital, Diabetes Recommendations

References
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  • APA Style

    Alhussain, H., Priyatha, V., Bashir, M. B., Ijaz, S., Farooq, U., et al. (2024). Analysing Health Professionals' Adherence to National Guidelines and Comparing Diabetes Care in Specialized Care Centres and Hospitals. American Journal of Internal Medicine, 12(1), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajim.20241201.11

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    ACS Style

    Alhussain, H.; Priyatha, V.; Bashir, M. B.; Ijaz, S.; Farooq, U., et al. Analysing Health Professionals' Adherence to National Guidelines and Comparing Diabetes Care in Specialized Care Centres and Hospitals. Am. J. Intern. Med. 2024, 12(1), 1-10. doi: 10.11648/j.ajim.20241201.11

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    AMA Style

    Alhussain H, Priyatha V, Bashir MB, Ijaz S, Farooq U, et al. Analysing Health Professionals' Adherence to National Guidelines and Comparing Diabetes Care in Specialized Care Centres and Hospitals. Am J Intern Med. 2024;12(1):1-10. doi: 10.11648/j.ajim.20241201.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ajim.20241201.11,
      author = {Haitham Alhussain and Vemparala Priyatha and Musa Bin Bashir and Saba Ijaz and Umar Farooq and Wondimagegn Tibebu Tilahun and Abrham Workineh Azale and Endalkachew Belayneh Melese and Nathnael Abera Woldehana and Ruth Betremariam Abebe and Helina Endazezew Tebeje},
      title = {Analysing Health Professionals' Adherence to National Guidelines and Comparing Diabetes Care in Specialized Care Centres and Hospitals},
      journal = {American Journal of Internal Medicine},
      volume = {12},
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      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ajim.20241201.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ajim.20241201.11},
      abstract = {The socioeconomic impact of diabetes treatment includes significant costs for diagnosis, treatments, hospitalizations, and associated social challenges. According to the International diabetic federation (IDF) guidelines, effective management entails a holistic strategy including nutritious diet, avoiding carbonated beverages, quitting smoking, and routine exercising. Targeted weight loss is critical, comprising antidiabetic medications, a specific food plan, and lifestyle changes to attain a 7-8% glycated hemoglobin level. Proper medicine and footwear use reduces ulcer risks and further complications. The IDF emphasizes detailed treatment plans and sequential screenings. Diabetes management is obligatory, focusing glycaemic control, lifestyle changes, and risk assessment. A study examines treatment programs, medical behaviour, and factors impacting diabetic care reception. This study examined diabetes mellitus treatment in medical facilities by conducting health information reviews in outpatient clinics with a sample size of 400 records. Java applets detected problems, indicating 95% confidence in therapy. Cross-sectional studies in Peshawar hospitals included 250 patients, whereas specialized diabetic treatment centers evaluated 150 patients. Documented care differed; public hospitals had lower foot inspection rates (16.4%) than specialized care (14%). Statistical analysis, such as the Chung test and binary logistic regression, was used to assess variable relationships. Smoking was common (86%), and 59.8% relied on oral anti-diabetic medications. Less than 30% follow up examinations were recorded in public hospitals which showed discrepancies in documentation. Diabetes management can be improved, particularly through better screening procedures. Discrepancies between provided and documented care underscore the need for higher documentation standards. Private clinics demonstrated comparatively better care, possibly influenced by consultation fees, facility availability, and a comfortable environment—attributes lacking in public hospitals in Pakistan.
    },
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Author Information
  • Department of Public Health and Infection Control, King Fahad Hospital, Alhofuf, Saudi Arabia

  • All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, India

  • Department of Cardiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiao Tong University, Xi’an, China; Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Government Polyclinic Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan

  • Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Government Polyclinic Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan; Department of Internal Medicine, Life Line Medical and Diagnostic Centre, Islamabad, Pakistan

  • Department of Cardiology, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar, Pakistan

  • Department of Internal Medicine, University of Gondar, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Department of Internal Medicine, Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States of America

  • Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States of America

  • Department of Internal Medicine, University of Gondar, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

  • Department of Internal Medicine, University of Gondar, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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