Volume 7, Issue 5, September 2019, Page: 60-63
Human Papilloma Virus Infection and Anal Cancer in Kidney Transplant Recipient
Kmar Mnif, Department of Nephrology, HediChaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
Soumaya Yaich, Department of Nephrology, HediChaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
Fatma Fendri, Department of Nephrology, HediChaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
Abdelrahmen Masmoudi, Department of Dermatology, HediChaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
Khaled Charfeddine, Department of Nephrology, HediChaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
Khawla Kammoun, Department of Nephrology, HediChaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
Jamil Hachicha, Department of Nephrology, HediChaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
Mohamed Ben Hmida, Department of Nephrology, HediChaker Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
Received: Feb. 5, 2019;       Accepted: Mar. 11, 2019;       Published: Oct. 16, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.sr.20190705.11      View  68      Downloads  11
Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide and causes anal cancer. The incidence of HPV infections in renal transplant recipients is 17% to 45%. Using immunosuppression treatment has been associated with significantly lower risks of de novo malignancies and viral infections after kidney transplantation. We reported the results of switching Tacrolimus to Sirolimus in a kidney transplant recipient who suffered from severe cutaneous warts.
Keywords
Kidney Transplantation, Human Papilloma Virus, Ano-Genital Neoplasms
To cite this article
Kmar Mnif, Soumaya Yaich, Fatma Fendri, Abdelrahmen Masmoudi, Khaled Charfeddine, Khawla Kammoun, Jamil Hachicha, Mohamed Ben Hmida, Human Papilloma Virus Infection and Anal Cancer in Kidney Transplant Recipient, American Journal of Internal Medicine. Vol. 7, No. 5, 2019, pp. 60-63. doi: 10.11648/j.sr.20190705.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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